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The physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing): evidence from field experiments in 24 forests across Japan

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, May 2009
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 285)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Citations

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282 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
397 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
The physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing): evidence from field experiments in 24 forests across Japan
Published in
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine, May 2009
DOI 10.1007/s12199-009-0086-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bum Jin Park, Yuko Tsunetsugu, Tamami Kasetani, Takahide Kagawa, Yoshifumi Miyazaki

Abstract

This paper reviews previous research on the physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing), and presents new results from field experiments conducted in 24 forests across Japan. The term Shinrin-yoku was coined by the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries in 1982, and can be defined as making contact with and taking in the atmosphere of the forest. In order to clarify the physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku, we conducted field experiments in 24 forests across Japan. In each experiment, 12 subjects (280 total; ages 21.7 +/- 1.5 year) walked in and viewed a forest or city area. On the first day, six subjects were sent to a forest area, and the others to a city area. On the second day, each group was sent to the other area as a cross-check. Salivary cortisol, blood pressure, pulse rate, and heart rate variability were used as indices. These indices were measured in the morning at the accommodation facility before breakfast and also both before and after the walking (for 16 +/- 5 min) and viewing (for 14 +/- 2 min). The R-R interval was also measured during the walking and viewing periods. The results show that forest environments promote lower concentrations of cortisol, lower pulse rate, lower blood pressure, greater parasympathetic nerve activity, and lower sympathetic nerve activity than do city environments. These results will contribute to the development of a research field dedicated to forest medicine, which may be used as a strategy for preventive medicine.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 254 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 397 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 1%
Spain 2 <1%
Japan 2 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 382 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 87 22%
Student > Bachelor 67 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 57 14%
Researcher 51 13%
Unspecified 35 9%
Other 99 25%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 65 16%
Psychology 62 16%
Environmental Science 53 13%
Social Sciences 46 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 35 9%
Other 135 34%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 899. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2019.
All research outputs
#5,119
of 13,647,320 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine
#1
of 285 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18
of 98,122 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,647,320 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 285 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 98,122 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them