↓ Skip to main content

Vitamin B2 intake reduces the risk for colorectal cancer: a dose–response analysis

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
Title
Vitamin B2 intake reduces the risk for colorectal cancer: a dose–response analysis
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, May 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00394-018-1702-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shuai Ben, Mulong Du, Gaoxiang Ma, Jianhua Qu, Liyang Zhu, Haiyan Chu, Zhengdong Zhang, Yuan Wu, Dongying Gu, Meilin Wang

Abstract

Several epidemiological studies have assessed the ability of vitamin B2 to prevent colorectal cancer (CRC), but the results are controversial results. We conducted a dose-response meta-analysis to investigate the association between vitamin B2 and CRC risk. We searched the PubMed and EMBASE database until January 3, 2018 to identify relevant studies. The pooled relative risks (RRs) with the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model or fixed-effects model. The dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic splines. A total of 14 studies reporting vitamin B2 intake and two studies reporting blood vitamin B2 concentration, comprising 14,934 cases and 1593 cases, respectively, were included in the meta-analysis. Vitamin B2 intake was inversely associated with CRC risk (RR = 0.87; 95% CI 0.81-0.93). Similar results were found for total vitamin B2 intake from diet and supplements (RR = 0.86; 95% CI 0.78-0.94) and dietary vitamin B2 intake (RR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.98) in subgroup analyses. The dose-response model indicated a non-linear trend, and CRC risk was reduced by 10% when vitamin B2 intake increased to 5 mg/day. In addition, high blood concentrations of vitamin B2 could also reduce the CRC risk (RR = 0.74; 95% CI 0.59-0.92). This dose-response analysis indicates that vitamin B2 intake is inversely associated with CRC risk. The inverse association may also exist between blood vitamin B2 concentration and CRC risk. These results suggest the importance of vitamin B2 intake in the prevention of CRC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 60%
Other 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 40%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 20%
Sports and Recreations 1 20%
Unspecified 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2019.
All research outputs
#8,240,610
of 13,145,847 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#965
of 1,433 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#160,582
of 269,082 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#65
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,145,847 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,433 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,082 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.