↓ Skip to main content

The Effect of Inter-Set Rest Intervals on Resistance Exercise-Induced Muscle Hypertrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, July 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
164 tweeters
facebook
37 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
12 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
289 Mendeley
Title
The Effect of Inter-Set Rest Intervals on Resistance Exercise-Induced Muscle Hypertrophy
Published in
Sports Medicine, July 2014
DOI 10.1007/s40279-014-0228-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Menno Henselmans, Brad J. Schoenfeld

Abstract

Due to a scarcity of longitudinal trials directly measuring changes in muscle girth, previous recommendations for inter-set rest intervals in resistance training programs designed to stimulate muscular hypertrophy were primarily based on the post-exercise endocrinological response and other mechanisms theoretically related to muscle growth. New research regarding the effects of inter-set rest interval manipulation on resistance training-induced muscular hypertrophy is reviewed here to evaluate current practices and provide directions for future research. Of the studies measuring long-term muscle hypertrophy in groups employing different rest intervals, none have found superior muscle growth in the shorter compared with the longer rest interval group and one study has found the opposite. Rest intervals less than 1 minute can result in acute increases in serum growth hormone levels and these rest intervals also decrease the serum testosterone to cortisol ratio. Long-term adaptations may abate the post-exercise endocrinological response and the relationship between the transient change in hormonal production and chronic muscular hypertrophy is highly contentious and appears to be weak. The relationship between the rest interval-mediated effect on immune system response, muscle damage, metabolic stress, or energy production capacity and muscle hypertrophy is still ambiguous and largely theoretical. In conclusion, the literature does not support the hypothesis that training for muscle hypertrophy requires shorter rest intervals than training for strength development or that predetermined rest intervals are preferable to auto-regulated rest periods in this regard.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 164 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 289 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 5 2%
United States 3 1%
Norway 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 272 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 69 24%
Student > Master 67 23%
Other 28 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 9%
Researcher 19 7%
Other 80 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 157 54%
Medicine and Dentistry 34 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 11%
Unspecified 24 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 5%
Other 27 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 123. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2019.
All research outputs
#117,836
of 13,211,544 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine
#124
of 2,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,909
of 192,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine
#3
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,211,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,186 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 31.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 192,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.