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The tiny-leaved orchid Cephalanthera subaphylla obtains most of its carbon via mycoheterotrophy

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Plant Research, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#39 of 433)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

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6 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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15 Mendeley
Title
The tiny-leaved orchid Cephalanthera subaphylla obtains most of its carbon via mycoheterotrophy
Published in
Journal of Plant Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10265-016-0856-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuki Sakamoto, Yuki Ogura-Tsujita, Kinuko Ito, Kenji Suetsugu, Jun Yokoyama, Jun Yamazaki, Tomohisa Yukawa, Masayuki Maki

Abstract

The evolution of mycoheterotrophy has been accompanied by extreme reductions in plant leaf size and photosynthetic capacity. Partially mycoheterotrophic plants, which obtain carbon from both photosynthesis and their mycorrhizal fungi, include species with leaves of normal size and others that are tiny-leaved. Thus, plant species may lose their leaves in a gradual process of size reduction rather than through a single step mutation. Little is known about how the degree of mycoheterotrophy changes during reductions in leaf size. We compared the degree of mycoheterotrophy among five Japanese Cephalanthera species, four with leaves of normal size (Cephalanthera falcata, Cephalanthera erecta, Cephalanthera longibracteata and Cephalanthera longifolia), one with tiny leaves (Cephalanthera subaphylla), and one albino form of C. falcata (as reference specimens for fully mycoheterotrophic plants). The levels of mycoheterotrophy were determined by stable isotope natural abundance analysis. All Cephalanthera species were relatively enriched in (13)C and (15)N in comparison with surrounding autotrophic plants. Cephalanthera subaphylla was strongly enriched in (13)C and (15)N to levels similar to the albinos. Species with leaves of normal size were significantly less enriched in (13)C than C. subaphylla and the albinos. Thus, C. subaphylla was strongly mycoheterotrophic, obtaining most of its carbon from mycorrhizal fungi even though it has tiny leaves; species with leaves of normal size were partially mycoheterotrophic. Hence, during the evolutionary pathway to full mycoheterotrophy, some plant species appear to have gained strong mycoheterotrophic abilities before completely losing foliage leaves.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 7%
Japan 1 7%
Unknown 13 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Other 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 87%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 March 2018.
All research outputs
#2,784,757
of 12,689,756 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Plant Research
#39
of 433 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#64,757
of 262,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Plant Research
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,689,756 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 433 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them