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Integrating eFAST in the initial management of stable trauma patients: the end of plain film radiography

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Intensive Care, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
78 Mendeley
Title
Integrating eFAST in the initial management of stable trauma patients: the end of plain film radiography
Published in
Annals of Intensive Care, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13613-016-0166-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie Rym Hamada, Nathalie Delhaye, Sebastien Kerever, Anatole Harrois, Jacques Duranteau

Abstract

The initial management of a trauma patient is a critical and demanding period. The use of extended focused assessment sonography for trauma (eFAST) has become more prevalent in trauma rooms, raising questions about the real "added value" of chest X-rays (CXRs) and pelvic X-rays (PXR), particularly in haemodynamically stable trauma patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a management protocol integrating eFAST and excluding X-rays in stable trauma patients. This was a prospective, interventional, single-centre study including all primary blunt trauma patients admitted to the trauma bay with a suspicion of severe trauma. All patients underwent physical examination and eFAST (assessing abdomen, pelvis, pericardium and pleura) before a whole-body CT scan (WBCT). Patients fulfilling all stability criteria at any time in transit from the scene of the accident to the hospital were managed in the trauma bay without chest and PXR. Amongst 430 patients, 148 fulfilled the stability criteria (stability criteria group) of which 122 (82 %) had no X-rays in the trauma bay. No diagnostic failure with an immediate clinical impact was identified in the stability criteria group (SC group). All cases of pneumothorax requiring chest drainage were identified by eFAST associated with a clinical examination before the WBCT scan in the SC group. The time spent in the trauma bay was significantly shorter for the SC group without X-rays compared to those who received any X-ray (25 [20; 35] vs. 38 [30; 60] min, respectively; p < 0.0001). An analysis of the cost and radiation exposure showed savings of 7000 Є and 100 mSv, respectively. No unrecognized diagnostic with a clinical impact due to the lack of CXR and PXR during the initial management of stable trauma patients was observed. The eFAST associated with physical examination provided the information necessary to safely complete the WBCT scan. It allowed a sensible cost and radiation saving.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Other 9 12%
Student > Postgraduate 9 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Other 19 24%
Unknown 13 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 53 68%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Computer Science 1 1%
Unspecified 1 1%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 1%
Other 1 1%
Unknown 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2019.
All research outputs
#2,642,898
of 14,381,489 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Intensive Care
#220
of 635 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,143
of 259,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Intensive Care
#2
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,381,489 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 635 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,325 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.