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Incidental memory in dogs (Canis familiaris): adaptive behavioral solution at an unexpected memory test

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, July 2012
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Title
Incidental memory in dogs (Canis familiaris): adaptive behavioral solution at an unexpected memory test
Published in
Animal Cognition, July 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10071-012-0529-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kazuo Fujita, Ayako Morisaki, Akiko Takaoka, Tomomi Maeda, Yusuke Hori

Abstract

Memory processing in nonhuman animals has been typically tested in situations where the animals are repeatedly trained to retrieve their memory trace, such as delayed matching to sample, serial probe recognition, etc. In contrast, how they utilize incidentally formed memory traces is not well investigated except in rodents. We examined whether domestic dogs could solve an unexpected test based on a single past experience. In Experiment 1, leashed dogs were led to 4 open, baited containers and allowed to eat from 2 of them (Exposure phase). After a walk outside for more than 10 min, during which time the containers were replaced with new identical ones, the dogs were unexpectedly returned to the site and unleashed for free exploration (test phase). Eleven out of 12 dogs first visited one of the containers from which they had not eaten. In Experiment 2, two containers had food in them, one had a nonedible object, and the last one was empty. Dogs visited all 4 containers and were allowed to eat one of the food rewards in the Exposure phase. In the test phase, unleashed dogs first visited the previously baited container from which they had not eaten significantly more often than chance. These results demonstrate that in an unexpected, test dogs may retrieve "what" and "where" information about seen (now invisible) items from incidental memory formed during a single past experience.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Hungary 3 4%
United Kingdom 3 4%
Australia 1 1%
Austria 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 59 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Master 7 10%
Other 5 7%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 25 36%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 30%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 6 9%
Unknown 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2012.
All research outputs
#9,767,849
of 12,222,940 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#805
of 902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,993
of 117,807 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#28
of 35 outputs
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We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.