↓ Skip to main content

Sensitivity to Interaural Time Differences Conveyed in the Stimulus Envelope: Estimating Inputs of Binaural Neurons Through the Temporal Analysis of Spike Trains

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO, June 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
39 Mendeley
Title
Sensitivity to Interaural Time Differences Conveyed in the Stimulus Envelope: Estimating Inputs of Binaural Neurons Through the Temporal Analysis of Spike Trains
Published in
Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10162-016-0573-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathias Dietz, Le Wang, David Greenberg, David McAlpine

Abstract

Sound-source localization in the horizontal plane relies on detecting small differences in the timing and level of the sound at the two ears, including differences in the timing of the modulated envelopes of high-frequency sounds (envelope interaural time differences (ITDs)). We investigated responses of single neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) to a wide range of envelope ITDs and stimulus envelope shapes. By a novel means of visualizing neural activity relative to different portions of the periodic stimulus envelope at each ear, we demonstrate the role of neuron-specific excitatory and inhibitory inputs in creating ITD sensitivity (or the lack of it) depending on the specific shape of the stimulus envelope. The underlying binaural brain circuitry and synaptic parameters were modeled individually for each neuron to account for neuron-specific activity patterns. The model explains the effects of envelope shapes on sensitivity to envelope ITDs observed in both normal-hearing listeners and in neural data, and has consequences for understanding how ITD information in stimulus envelopes might be maximized in users of bilateral cochlear implants-for whom ITDs conveyed in the stimulus envelope are the only ITD cues available.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 37 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 31%
Researcher 7 18%
Unspecified 5 13%
Student > Master 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 14 36%
Unspecified 6 15%
Engineering 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Psychology 3 8%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2016.
All research outputs
#11,961,610
of 13,492,252 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO
#231
of 275 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,208
of 266,423 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology : JARO
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,492,252 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 275 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,423 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.