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Bathing before sleep in the young and in the elderly

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, June 1999
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
44 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
Bathing before sleep in the young and in the elderly
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, June 1999
DOI 10.1007/s004210050560
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kiyoko Kanda, Yutaka Tochihara, Tadakatsu Ohnaka

Abstract

In this study we investigated the effects of bathing on the quality of sleep in 30 elderly people (ages 65-83 years) and in 30 young people (ages 17-22 years) in their homes. Room temperature did not vary significantly during the nights that data were acquired, ranging from 8 to 12 degrees C. After bathing and at the beginning of sleep, the mean (SE) rectal temperatures of the young and the elderly were 37.8 (0.08) and 37.5 (0.07) degrees C, respectively, and were higher by 0.7 (0.13) and 0.6 (0.07) degrees C, respectively, than when the subjects had not bathed. At the beginning of the sleep after bathing in the young subjects, skin temperature was 32.5 (0.24) and 1.5 (0.34) degrees C higher than when those subjects had not bathed. In the elderly, however, there were no significant differences in skin temperature with and without prior bathing because they used electric blankets during sleep. After bathing, the young people reported "warmth" in their hands and/or legs, while the elderly more often reported "good sleep" or "quickness of falling asleep". During the first 3 h of sleep, body movements were less frequent after bathing for both the young and the elderly subjects. The results suggest that a bath before sleep enhances the quality of sleep, particularly in the elderly.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Singapore 1 3%
Unknown 37 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 21%
Student > Master 7 18%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 10 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 32%
Sports and Recreations 7 18%
Psychology 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Design 3 8%
Other 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 77. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 July 2019.
All research outputs
#217,476
of 13,500,063 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#60
of 2,981 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,952
of 265,237 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#3
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,500,063 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,981 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,237 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.