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Women’s beliefs about medication use during their pregnancy: a UK perspective

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 603)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
25 news outlets
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
44 Mendeley
Title
Women’s beliefs about medication use during their pregnancy: a UK perspective
Published in
International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11096-016-0322-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. J. Twigg, A. Lupattelli, H. Nordeng

Abstract

Background Previous research has examined the number and extent of medicines taking in pregnant women but not their beliefs and risk perception surrounding their use. Objective To describe beliefs and risk perception associated with medicines use for the treatment of common acute conditions among UK women and explore whether this is related to actual medicines use. Settings Cross-sectional, web-based study in the UK. Methods Pregnant women and mothers within 1 year of giving birth were invited to participate in an online cross-sectional questionnaire-based study via a pregnancy website in the UK. Anonymous data were collected from women regarding their use of medicines (both over-the-counter and prescribed) and their beliefs regarding medicines use during pregnancy. Main outcome measures Pregnant women's beliefs about medicines and their relation to pharmacological treatment of acute conditions in pregnancy. Results Pharmacological treatment of conditions in pregnancy ranged from 65.4 % for urinary tract infections (UTIs) to 1.1 % for sleeping problems. Almost three out of ten women avoided using some medications during pregnancy. For heartburn and UTIs, women who did not treat the condition viewed medicines in general as being overused, more harmful and less beneficial, than those who treated the condition. In general, UK pregnant women perceived medicines to be beneficial and slightly overused. Conclusions Women's beliefs about medications impact on treatment of specific conditions in pregnancy such as heartburn and UTIs. Healthcare professionals should explore patient's beliefs regarding medication at the first maternity care visit to promote appropriate medication use in pregnancy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 44 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Student > Master 7 16%
Librarian 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Lecturer 3 7%
Other 10 23%
Unknown 6 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Physics and Astronomy 2 5%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 6 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 210. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2017.
All research outputs
#58,097
of 13,022,627 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
#1
of 603 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,545
of 265,066 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,022,627 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 603 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,066 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them