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Parents’ Perspectives on Participating in Genetic Research in Autism

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, July 2012
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
Title
Parents’ Perspectives on Participating in Genetic Research in Autism
Published in
Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders, July 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10803-012-1592-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Magan Trottier, Wendy Roberts, Irene Drmic, Stephen W. Scherer, Rosanna Weksberg, Cheryl Cytrynbaum, David Chitayat, Cheryl Shuman, Fiona A. Miller

Abstract

Genetic research in autism depends on the willingness of individuals with autism to participate; thus, there is a duty to assess participants' needs in the research process. We report on families' motives and expectations related to their participation in autism genetic research. Respondents valued having a genetic result, as it alleviates guilt, promotes awareness, and may be used to tailor interventions and for family planning. The act of participating was distinctly significant, as it provided personal control, a connection to autism experts, networking with families, and hope for the future. The results of this study highlight complex factors involved in families' decisions to participate in autism genetic research and provide points to consider for this population of research participants.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 59 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 19%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 11%
Unspecified 6 10%
Other 13 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 24 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 16%
Unspecified 9 15%
Social Sciences 6 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2012.
All research outputs
#7,317,114
of 12,316,253 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#2,305
of 3,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,538
of 117,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Autism & Developmental Disorders
#78
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 117,464 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.