↓ Skip to main content

Relationships Among Spirituality, Religious Practices, Personality Factors, and Health for Five Different Faith Traditions

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Religion & Health, May 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 696)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
42 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
140 Mendeley
Title
Relationships Among Spirituality, Religious Practices, Personality Factors, and Health for Five Different Faith Traditions
Published in
Journal of Religion & Health, May 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10943-012-9615-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Brick Johnstone, Dong Pil Yoon, Daniel Cohen, Laura H. Schopp, Guy McCormack, James Campbell, Marian Smith

Abstract

To determine: (1) differences in spirituality, religiosity, personality, and health for different faith traditions; and (2) the relative degree to which demographic, spiritual, religious, and personality variables simultaneously predict health outcomes for different faith traditions. Cross-sectional analysis of 160 individuals from five different faith traditions including Buddhists (40), Catholics (41), Jews (22), Muslims (26), and Protestants (31). Brief multidimensional measure of religiousness/spirituality (BMMRS; Fetzer in Multidimensional measurement of religiousness/spirituality for use in health research, Fetzer Institute, Kalamazoo, 1999); NEO-five factor inventory (NEO-FFI; in Revised NEO personality inventory (NEO PI-R) and the NEO-five factor inventory (NEO-FFI) professional manual, Psychological Assessment Resources, Odessa, Costa and McCrae 1992); Medical outcomes scale-short form (SF-36; in SF-36 physical and mental health summary scores: A user's manual, The Health Institute, New England Medical Center, Boston, Ware et al. 1994). (1) ANOVAs indicated that there were no significant group differences in health status, but that there were group differences in spirituality and religiosity. (2) Pearson's correlations for the entire sample indicated that better mental health is significantly related to increased spirituality, increased positive personality traits (i.e., extraversion) and decreased personality traits (i.e., neuroticism and conscientiousness). In addition, spirituality is positively correlated with positive personality traits (i.e., extraversion) and negatively with negative personality traits (i.e., neuroticism). (3) Hierarchical regressions indicated that personality predicted a greater proportion of unique variance in health outcomes than spiritual variables. Different faith traditions have similar health status, but differ in terms of spiritual, religious, and personality factors. For all faith traditions, the presence of positive and absence of negative personality traits are primary predictors of positive health (and primarily mental health). Spiritual variables, other than forgiveness, add little to the prediction of unique variance in physical or mental health after considering personality. Spirituality can be conceptualized as a characterological aspect of personality or a distinct construct, but spiritual interventions should continue to be used in clinical practice and investigated in health research.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 140 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 6%
Malaysia 4 3%
Portugal 2 1%
Colombia 2 1%
Japan 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 120 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 40 29%
Student > Master 25 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 16 11%
Researcher 9 6%
Other 33 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 62 44%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 14%
Social Sciences 19 14%
Unspecified 12 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Other 18 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 117. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2019.
All research outputs
#126,261
of 13,199,669 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Religion & Health
#4
of 696 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#780
of 120,906 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Religion & Health
#1
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,199,669 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 696 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 120,906 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them