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Compassion, Ethics, and Neuroscience: Neuroethics Through Buddhist Eyes

Overview of attention for article published in Science & Engineering Ethics, May 2012
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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79 Mendeley
Title
Compassion, Ethics, and Neuroscience: Neuroethics Through Buddhist Eyes
Published in
Science & Engineering Ethics, May 2012
DOI 10.1007/s11948-012-9369-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karma Lekshe Tsomo

Abstract

As scientists advance knowledge of the brain and develop technologies to measure, evaluate, and manipulate brain function, numerous questions arise for religious adherents. If neuroscientists can conclusively establish that there is a functional network between neural impulses and an individual's capacity for moral evaluation of situations, this will naturally lead to questions about the relationship between such a network and constructions of moral value and ethical human behavior. For example, if cognitive neuroscience can show that there is a neurophysiological basis for the moral appraisal of situations, it may be argued that the world's religions, which have traditionally been the keepers and purveyors of ethical values, are rendered either spurious or irrelevant. The questions point up broader dilemmas in the interface between science and religion, and raise concerns about the ethics of neurological research and experimentation. Since human beings will still arbitrate what is "moral" or "ethical," how can religious perspectives enrich the dialogue on neuroethical issues and how can neuroscience enrich dialogue on religion? Buddhist views on the nature of consciousness and methods of practice, especially meditation practice, may contribute to discussions on neuroscience and theories about the interrelationship between consciousness and ethical awareness by exploring the role that karma, intentionality, and compassion play in Buddhist understandings of the interrelationship between consciousness and ethics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 79 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 2 3%
United States 1 1%
Russia 1 1%
Unknown 75 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 32%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Other 8 10%
Student > Master 6 8%
Other 21 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 14%
Social Sciences 10 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 11%
Neuroscience 8 10%
Other 15 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,604,288
of 12,167,359 outputs
Outputs from Science & Engineering Ethics
#459
of 628 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,357
of 111,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science & Engineering Ethics
#5
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,167,359 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 628 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,482 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.