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MicroRNA-99a regulates early chondrogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells by targeting the BMPR2 gene

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Tissue Research, May 2016
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Title
MicroRNA-99a regulates early chondrogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells by targeting the BMPR2 gene
Published in
Cell & Tissue Research, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00441-016-2416-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xiaozhong Zhou, Jing Wang, Hongtao Sun, Yong Qi, Wangyang Xu, Dixin Luo, Xunjie Jin, Chao Li, Weijian Chen, Zhousheng Lin, Feimeng Li, Ran Zhang, Guitao Li

Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are candidates for the regeneration of articular cartilage as they possess the potential for chondrogenic differentiation. MSCs are easily obtained and expanded in vitro. Specific microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate chondrogenesis have yet to be identified and the mechanisms involved remain to be defined. The miRNAs regulate biological processes by binding target mRNA to reduce protein synthesis. In this study, we show that expression of miR-99a and miR-125b-3p were increased during early chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs (rMSCs) derived from the Norwegian brown rat (Rattus norvegicus). MiR-99a knockdown promoted proteoglycan deposition and increased the expression of ACAN and COL2A1 during early chondrogenic differentiation. MiR-99a knockdown promoted early chondrogenic differentiation of rMSCs. A dual-luciferase reporter gene assay showed that miR-99a targeted a putative binding site in the 3'-UTR of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptor type 2 (BMPR2). Overexpression of miR-99a reduced the expression levels of BMPR2 protein. The expression of total p38 and p-p38 increased at 7 and 14 days during early chondrogenic differentiation of rMSCs. Reduction in levels of total p38 and p-p38 protein followed miR-99a overexpression during early chondrogenic differentiation of rMSCs. BMPR2 silencing reversed the effects of miR-99a inhibition on proteoglycan deposition and protein expression of ACAN, COL2A1, total p38 and p-p38 during early chondrogenic differentiation of rMSCs. In conclusion, the findings of these in vitro studies in rat MSCs support a role for miR-99a as a negative regulator of early chondrogenic differentiation by directly targeting the BMPR2 gene at an early stage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 4 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 4 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 50%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 25%
Student > Bachelor 1 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2016.
All research outputs
#10,839,549
of 12,228,143 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Tissue Research
#1,306
of 1,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,672
of 277,190 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Tissue Research
#35
of 58 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,228,143 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,535 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 58 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.