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Relationship Between Spiritual Coping and Survival in Patients with HIV

Overview of attention for article published in JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine, May 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (86th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
26 Mendeley
Title
Relationship Between Spiritual Coping and Survival in Patients with HIV
Published in
JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11606-016-3668-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gail Ironson, Heidemarie Kremer, Aurelie Lucette

Abstract

Studies of spirituality in initially healthy people have shown a survival advantage, yet there are fewer research studies in the medically ill, despite the widespread use of spirituality/religiousness to cope with serious physical illness. In addition, many studies have used limited measures such as religious service attendance. We aimed to examine if, independent of medication adherence, the use of spirituality/religiousness to cope with HIV predicts survival over 17 years. This was a longitudinal study, started in 1997. Study materials were administered semi annually. A diverse sample of 177 HIV patients initially in the mid-stage of disease (150-500 CD4-cells/mm(3); no prior AIDS-defining symptoms) participated in the study. Participants were administered a battery of psychosocial questionnaires and a blood draw. They completed interviews and essays to assess current stressors. Spiritual coping (overall/strategies) was rated by qualitative content analysis of interviews regarding stress and coping with HIV, and essays. Controlling for medical variables (baseline CD4/viral load) and demographics, Cox regression analyses showed that overall positive spiritual coping significantly predicted greater survival over 17 years (mortality HR = 0.56, p = 0.039). Findings held even after controlling for health behaviors (medication adherence, substance use) and social support. Particular spiritual coping strategies that predicted longer survival included spiritual practices (HR = 0.26, p < 0.001), spiritual reframing (HR = 0.27, p = 0.006), overcoming spiritual guilt (HR = 0.24, p < 0.001), spiritual gratitude (HR = 0.40, p = 0.002), and spiritual empowerment (HR = 0.52, p = 0.024), indicating that people using these strategies were 2-4 times more likely to survive. To our knowledge this is the first study showing a prospective relationship of spiritual coping in people who are medically ill with survival over such a long period of time, and also specifically identifies several strategies of spirituality that may be beneficial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 19%
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 6 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 12%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Other 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2019.
All research outputs
#539,544
of 13,533,246 outputs
Outputs from JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine
#492
of 4,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,756
of 261,167 outputs
Outputs of similar age from JGIM: Journal of General Internal Medicine
#13
of 94 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,533,246 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,881 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,167 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 94 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.