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Cost-Benefit Analysis of Communities That Care Outcomes at Eighth Grade

Overview of attention for article published in Prevention Science, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 572)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
Title
Cost-Benefit Analysis of Communities That Care Outcomes at Eighth Grade
Published in
Prevention Science, November 2011
DOI 10.1007/s11121-011-0259-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Margaret R. Kuklinski, John S. Briney, J. David Hawkins, Richard F. Catalano

Abstract

This paper presents a cost-benefit analysis of the Communities That Care (CTC) prevention system, a public health approach to reducing risk, enhancing protection, and reducing the prevalence of adolescent health and behavior problems community wide. The analysis is based on outcomes from a panel of students followed from Grade 5 through Grade 8 in a randomized controlled trial involving 24 communities in 7 states. Previous analyses have shown that CTC prevented the initiation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and delinquency by the end of 8th grade in CTC communities compared to controls. This paper estimates long-term monetary benefits associated with significant intervention effects on cigarette smoking and delinquency as compared to the cost of conducting the intervention. Under conservative cost assumptions, the net present benefit is $5,250 per youth, including $812 from the prevention of cigarette smoking and $4,438 from the prevention of delinquency. The benefit-cost ratio indicates a return of $5.30 per $1.00 invested. Under less conservative but still viable cost assumptions, the benefit-cost ratio due to prevention of cigarette smoking and delinquency increases to $10.23 per $1.00 invested. Benefits from CTC's reduction in alcohol initiation as well as broader inclusion of quality-of-life gains would further increase CTC's benefit-cost ratio. Results provide evidence that CTC is a cost-beneficial preventive intervention and a good investment of public dollars, even under very conservative cost and benefit assumptions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 5%
Colombia 1 2%
Unknown 52 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 18%
Student > Master 8 14%
Professor 7 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Other 10 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 38%
Social Sciences 14 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 14%
Unspecified 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 4%
Other 5 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2016.
All research outputs
#625,697
of 8,515,357 outputs
Outputs from Prevention Science
#48
of 572 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,339
of 94,976 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Prevention Science
#2
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,515,357 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 572 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,976 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.