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Involvement of long non-coding RNAs in beta cell failure at the onset of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetologia, June 2015
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Title
Involvement of long non-coding RNAs in beta cell failure at the onset of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice
Published in
Diabetologia, June 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00125-015-3641-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Motterle, Sonia Gattesco, Dorothée Caille, Paolo Meda, Romano Regazzi

Abstract

Exposure of pancreatic beta cells to cytokines released by islet-infiltrating immune cells induces alterations in gene expression, leading to impaired insulin secretion and apoptosis in the initial phases of type 1 diabetes. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a new class of transcripts participating in the development of many diseases. As little is known about their role in insulin-secreting cells, this study aimed to evaluate their contribution to beta cell dysfunction. The expression of lncRNAs was determined by microarray in the MIN6 beta cell line exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. The changes induced by cytokines were further assessed by real-time PCR in islets of control and NOD mice. The involvement of selected lncRNAs modified by cytokines was assessed after their overexpression in MIN6 cells and primary islet cells. MIN6 cells were found to express a large number of lncRNAs, many of which were modified by cytokine treatment. The changes in the level of selected lncRNAs were confirmed in mouse islets and an increase in these lncRNAs was also seen in prediabetic NOD mice. Overexpression of these lncRNAs in MIN6 and mouse islet cells, either alone or in combination with cytokines, favoured beta cell apoptosis without affecting insulin production or secretion. Furthermore, overexpression of lncRNA-1 promoted nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B cells 1 (NF-κB). Our study shows that lncRNAs are modulated during the development of type 1 diabetes in NOD mice, and that their overexpression sensitises beta cells to apoptosis, probably contributing to their failure during the initial phases of the disease.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 25%
Professor 4 17%
Student > Master 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Other 7 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Unspecified 3 13%
Social Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 April 2016.
All research outputs
#9,769,668
of 12,225,951 outputs
Outputs from Diabetologia
#3,243
of 3,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,423
of 278,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetologia
#91
of 100 outputs
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