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The impact of hypoxia on intestinal epithelial cell functions: consequences for invasion by bacterial pathogens

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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4 X users

Citations

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87 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
157 Mendeley
Title
The impact of hypoxia on intestinal epithelial cell functions: consequences for invasion by bacterial pathogens
Published in
Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40348-016-0041-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nathalie E. Zeitouni, Sucheera Chotikatum, Maren von Köckritz-Blickwede, Hassan Y. Naim

Abstract

The maintenance of oxygen homeostasis in human tissues is mediated by several cellular adaptations in response to low-oxygen stress, called hypoxia. A decrease in tissue oxygen levels is initially counteracted by increasing local blood flow to overcome diminished oxygenation and avoid hypoxic stress. However, studies have shown that the physiological oxygen concentrations in several tissues are much lower than atmospheric (normoxic) conditions, and the oxygen supply is finely regulated in individual cell types. The gastrointestinal tract has been described to subsist in a state of physiologically low oxygen level and is thus depicted as a tissue in the state of constant low-grade inflammation. The intestinal epithelial cell layer plays a vital role in the immune response to inflammation and infections that occur within the intestinal tissue and is involved in many of the adaptation responses to hypoxic stress. This is especially relevant in the context of inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, this review aims to describe the intestinal epithelial cellular response to hypoxia and the consequences for host interactions with invading gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 <1%
Unknown 156 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 45 29%
Student > Master 20 13%
Researcher 19 12%
Student > Bachelor 19 12%
Professor 9 6%
Other 22 14%
Unknown 23 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 34 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 31 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 16 10%
Engineering 6 4%
Other 25 16%
Unknown 27 17%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 May 2020.
All research outputs
#13,228,333
of 22,858,915 outputs
Outputs from Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics
#32
of 98 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#142,090
of 300,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,858,915 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 98 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,114 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.