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Depurinating estrogen‐DNA adducts, generators of cancer initiation: their minimization leads to cancer prevention

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical and Translational Medicine, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 352)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
61 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
Title
Depurinating estrogen‐DNA adducts, generators of cancer initiation: their minimization leads to cancer prevention
Published in
Clinical and Translational Medicine, March 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40169-016-0088-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ercole L. Cavalieri, Eleanor G. Rogan

Abstract

Estrogens can initiate cancer by reacting with DNA. Specific metabolites of endogenous estrogens, the catechol estrogen-3,4-quinones, react with DNA to form depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts. Loss of these adducts leaves apurinic sites in the DNA, generating mutations that can lead to the initiation of cancer. A variety of endogenous and exogenous factors can disrupt estrogen homeostasis, which is the normal balance between estrogen activating and protective enzymes. In fact, if estrogen metabolism becomes unbalanced and generates excessive catechol estrogen 3,4-quinones, formation of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts increases and the risk of initiating cancer is greater. The levels of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts are high in women diagnosed with breast cancer and those at high risk for the disease. High levels of depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts before the presence of breast cancer indicates that adduct formation is a critical factor in breast cancer initiation. Women with thyroid or ovarian cancer also have high levels of estrogen-DNA adducts, as do men with prostate cancer or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Depurinating estrogen-DNA adducts are initiators of many prevalent types of human cancer. These findings and other discoveries led to the recognition that reducing the levels of estrogen-DNA adducts could prevent the initiation of human cancer. The dietary supplements N-acetylcysteine and resveratrol inhibit formation of estrogen-DNA adducts in cultured human breast cells and in women. These results suggest that the two supplements offer an approach to reducing the risk of developing various prevalent types of human cancer. Graphical abstract Major metabolic pathway in cancer initiation by estrogens.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ukraine 1 1%
Unknown 85 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 17 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Master 10 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 17 20%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 21 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 7%
Chemistry 6 7%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 25 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2020.
All research outputs
#2,113,344
of 17,359,532 outputs
Outputs from Clinical and Translational Medicine
#47
of 352 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,037
of 314,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical and Translational Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,359,532 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 352 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,953 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them