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Comprehension of human pointing gestures in young human-reared wolves (Canis lupus) and dogs (Canis familiaris)

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 blog

Citations

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mendeley
343 Mendeley
Title
Comprehension of human pointing gestures in young human-reared wolves (Canis lupus) and dogs (Canis familiaris)
Published in
Animal Cognition, January 2008
DOI 10.1007/s10071-007-0127-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zsófia Virányi, Márta Gácsi, Enikő Kubinyi, József Topál, Beatrix Belényi, Dorottya Ujfalussy, Ádám Miklósi

Abstract

Dogs have a remarkable skill to use human-given cues in object-choice tasks, but little is known to what extent their closest wild-living relative, the wolf can achieve this performance. In Study 1, we compared wolf and dog pups hand-reared individually and pet dogs of the same age in their readiness to form eye-contact with a human experimenter in an object-choice task and to follow her pointing gesture. The results showed that dogs already at 4 months of age use momentary distal pointing to find hidden food even without intensive early socialization. Wolf pups, on the contrary, do not attend to this subtle pointing. Accordingly in Studies 2 and 3, these wolves were tested longitudinally with this and four other (easier) human-given cues. This revealed that wolves socialized at a comparable level to dogs are able to use simple human-given cues spontaneously if the human's hand is close to the baited container (e.g. touching, proximal pointing). Study 4 showed that wolves can follow also momentary distal pointing similarly to dogs if they have received extensive formal training. Comparing the wolves to naïve pet dogs of the same age revealed that during several months of formal training wolves can reach the level of dogs in their success of following momentary distal pointing in parallel with improving their readiness to form eye-contact with a human experimenter. We assume that the high variability in the wolves' communicative behaviour might have provided a basis for selection during the course of domestication of the dog.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 343 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Austria 4 1%
United Kingdom 4 1%
Germany 3 <1%
Brazil 3 <1%
Hungary 3 <1%
India 2 <1%
Italy 2 <1%
Czechia 2 <1%
Other 13 4%
Unknown 301 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 71 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 69 20%
Student > Master 58 17%
Student > Bachelor 45 13%
Other 24 7%
Other 76 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 189 55%
Psychology 52 15%
Environmental Science 33 10%
Unspecified 27 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 3%
Other 30 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2012.
All research outputs
#826,709
of 4,768,707 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#223
of 540 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,271
of 234,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#5
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,768,707 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 540 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.