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Performance and thermoregulatory effects of chronic bupropion administration in the heat

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2008
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Title
Performance and thermoregulatory effects of chronic bupropion administration in the heat
Published in
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, November 2008
DOI 10.1007/s00421-008-0929-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bart Roelands, Hiroshi Hasegawa, Philip Watson, Maria Francesca Piacentini, Luk Buyse, Guy De Schutter, Romain Meeusen

Abstract

The combination of acute dopamine/noradrenaline reuptake inhibition (bupropion; BUP) and heat stress (30 degrees C) significantly improves performance (9%). Furthermore the maintenance of a higher power output resulted in the attainment of significantly higher heart rates and rectal temperatures--above 40 degrees C--in the BUP trial compared to the placebo trial. Since BUP is an aid to cease smoking that is taken for longer periods, question remains if similar performance and thermoregulatory effects are found following administration of BUP over several days (10 days). The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of chronic BUP on exercise performance, thermoregulation and hormonal variables in the heat. Eight trained male cyclists participated in the study. Subjects completed two trials consisting of 60 min fixed intensity exercise (55% W (max)) followed by a time trial (TT) in a double-blind randomized crossover design. Exercise was performed in 30 degrees C. Subjects took either placebo (PLAC) or BUP (Zyban) for 3 days (150 mg), followed by 300 mg for 7 days. Chronic BUP did not influence TT performance (BUP 40'42'' +/- 4'18''; PLAC 41'36'' +/- 5'12''), but significantly increased core temperature (P = 0.030). BUP significantly increased circulating growth hormone levels (PLAC: 9.8 +/- 5.8 ng L(-1); BUP: 13 +/- 6.8 ng L(-1); P < 0.008). Chronic BUP did not influence TT performance in 30 degrees C and subjects did not reach core temperature values as high as observed during the acute BUP study. It seems that chronic administration results in an adaptation of central neurotransmitter homeostasis, resulting in a different response to the drug.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
New Zealand 1 3%
Unknown 36 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 28%
Student > Master 6 15%
Unspecified 5 13%
Researcher 5 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 8%
Other 10 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 33%
Unspecified 8 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 13%
Psychology 2 5%
Other 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2016.
All research outputs
#9,766,358
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#2,324
of 2,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#206,091
of 291,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
#38
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,771 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 291,654 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.