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Pesticide exposure in honey bees results in increased levels of the gut pathogen Nosema

Overview of attention for article published in Naturwissenschaften, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 1,491)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
23 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
239 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
482 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Pesticide exposure in honey bees results in increased levels of the gut pathogen Nosema
Published in
Naturwissenschaften, January 2012
DOI 10.1007/s00114-011-0881-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffery S. Pettis, Dennis vanEngelsdorp, Josephine Johnson, Galen Dively

Abstract

Global pollinator declines have been attributed to habitat destruction, pesticide use, and climate change or some combination of these factors, and managed honey bees, Apis mellifera, are part of worldwide pollinator declines. Here we exposed honey bee colonies during three brood generations to sub-lethal doses of a widely used pesticide, imidacloprid, and then subsequently challenged newly emerged bees with the gut parasite, Nosema spp. The pesticide dosages used were below levels demonstrated to cause effects on longevity or foraging in adult honey bees. Nosema infections increased significantly in the bees from pesticide-treated hives when compared to bees from control hives demonstrating an indirect effect of pesticides on pathogen growth in honey bees. We clearly demonstrate an increase in pathogen growth within individual bees reared in colonies exposed to one of the most widely used pesticides worldwide, imidacloprid, at below levels considered harmful to bees. The finding that individual bees with undetectable levels of the target pesticide, after being reared in a sub-lethal pesticide environment within the colony, had higher Nosema is significant. Interactions between pesticides and pathogens could be a major contributor to increased mortality of honey bee colonies, including colony collapse disorder, and other pollinator declines worldwide.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 482 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 14 3%
France 4 <1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Mexico 3 <1%
Canada 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Serbia 1 <1%
Other 8 2%
Unknown 443 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 98 20%
Student > Bachelor 82 17%
Researcher 81 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 80 17%
Unspecified 28 6%
Other 113 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 292 61%
Environmental Science 72 15%
Unspecified 34 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 23 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 2%
Other 50 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 105. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2019.
All research outputs
#153,402
of 13,606,441 outputs
Outputs from Naturwissenschaften
#29
of 1,491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,322
of 209,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Naturwissenschaften
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,606,441 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,491 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 209,378 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.