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Do They Stay or Do They Go? The Switching Decisions of Individuals Who Enter Gender Atypical College Majors

Overview of attention for article published in Sex Roles, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 1,892)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
176 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Do They Stay or Do They Go? The Switching Decisions of Individuals Who Enter Gender Atypical College Majors
Published in
Sex Roles, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s11199-016-0583-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine Riegle-Crumb, Barbara King, Chelsea Moore

Abstract

Drawing on prior theoretical and empirical research on gender segregation within educational fields as well as occupations, we examine the pathways of college students who at least initially embark on a gender-atypical path. Specifically, we explore whether women who enter fields that are male-dominated are more likely to switch fields than their female peers who have chosen other fields, as well as whether men who enter female-dominated majors are more likely to subsequently switch fields than their male peers who have chosen a more normative field. We utilize a sample of 3702 students from a nationally representative dataset on U.S. undergraduates, the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS 2004/09). Logistic regression models examine the likelihood that students switch majors, controlling for students' social and academic background. Results reveal different patterns for men and women. Men who enter a female-dominated major are significantly more likely to switch majors than their male peers in other majors. By contrast, women in male-dominated fields are not more likely to switch fields compared to their female peers in other fields. The results are robust to supplementary analyses that include alternative specifications of the independent and dependent variables. The implications of our findings for the maintenance of gendered occupational segregation are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 176 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 49 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 30%
Student > Bachelor 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Unspecified 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Other 12 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 22 44%
Unspecified 8 16%
Psychology 8 16%
Engineering 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Other 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 129. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2018.
All research outputs
#112,507
of 13,261,910 outputs
Outputs from Sex Roles
#44
of 1,892 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,097
of 267,258 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sex Roles
#1
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,261,910 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,892 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,258 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.