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Cross-stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast—new insight into an old phenomenon

Overview of attention for article published in Cell Stress and Chaperones, January 2016
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1 tweeter

Citations

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Readers on

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67 Mendeley
Title
Cross-stress resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast—new insight into an old phenomenon
Published in
Cell Stress and Chaperones, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s12192-016-0667-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agata Święciło

Abstract

Acquired stress resistance is the result of mild stress causing the acquisition of resistance to severe stress of the same or a different type. The mechanism of "same-stress" resistance (resistance to a second, strong stress after mild primary stress of the same type) probably depends on the activation of defense and repair mechanisms specific for a particular type of stress, while cross-stress resistance (i.e., resistance to a second, strong stress after a different type of mild primary stress) is the effect of activation of both a specific and general stress response program, which in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast is known as the environmental stress response (ESR). Advancements in research techniques have made it possible to study the mechanism of cross-stress resistance at various levels of cellular organization: stress signal transduction pathways, regulation of gene expression, and transcription or translation processes. As a result of this type of research, views on the cross-stress protection mechanism have been reconsidered. It was originally thought that cross-stress resistance, irrespective of the nature of the two stresses, was determined by universal mechanisms, i.e., the same mechanisms within the general stress response. They are now believed to be more specific and strictly dependent on the features of the first stress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 67 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 66 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 13%
Researcher 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 21%
Engineering 3 4%
Psychology 2 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 3%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2016.
All research outputs
#10,951,902
of 12,358,444 outputs
Outputs from Cell Stress and Chaperones
#322
of 410 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#280,442
of 340,527 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell Stress and Chaperones
#15
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,358,444 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 410 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 340,527 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.