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Measuring the emotion-specificity of rapid stimulus-driven attraction of attention to fearful faces: evidence from emotion categorization and a comparison with disgusted faces

Overview of attention for article published in Psychological Research, January 2016
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Title
Measuring the emotion-specificity of rapid stimulus-driven attraction of attention to fearful faces: evidence from emotion categorization and a comparison with disgusted faces
Published in
Psychological Research, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00426-016-0743-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shah Khalid, Gernot Horstmann, Thomas Ditye, Ulrich Ansorge

Abstract

In the current study, we tested whether a fear advantage-rapid attraction of attention to fearful faces that is more stimulus-driven than to neutral faces-is emotion specific. We used a cueing task with face cues preceding targets. Cues were non-predictive of the target locations. In two experiments, we found enhanced cueing of saccades towards the targets with fearful face cues than with neutral face cues: Saccades towards targets were more efficient with cues and targets at the same position (under valid conditions) than at opposite positions (under invalid conditions), and this cueing effect was stronger with fearful than with neutral face cues. In addition, this cueing effect difference between fearful and neutral faces was absent with inverted faces as cues, indicating that the fear advantage is face-specific. We also show that emotion categorization of the face cues mirrored these effects: Participants were better at categorizing face cues as fearful or neutral with upright than with inverted faces (Experiment 1). Finally, in alternative blocks including disgusted faces instead of fearful faces, we found more similar cueing effects with disgusted faces and neutral faces, and with upright and inverted faces (Experiment 2). Jointly, these results demonstrate that the fear advantage is emotion-specific. Results are discussed in light of evolutionary explanations of the fear advantage.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Unknown 25 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 23%
Unspecified 5 19%
Other 4 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 6 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 50%
Unspecified 6 23%
Neuroscience 6 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 January 2016.
All research outputs
#11,156,829
of 12,541,300 outputs
Outputs from Psychological Research
#501
of 596 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#274,742
of 334,196 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psychological Research
#26
of 30 outputs
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