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Voiding postponement in children—a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, January 2016
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Title
Voiding postponement in children—a systematic review
Published in
European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00787-015-0814-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander von Gontard, Justine Niemczyk, Catharina Wagner, Monika Equit

Abstract

Voiding postponement (VP) has been defined as a habitual postponement of micturition using holding maneuvers. VP can represent both a symptom, as well as a condition. As divergent definitions are used internationally, the aim was to review the current state of knowledge on VP and provide recommendations for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. A Scopus and a Pubmed search was conducted, entering the terms 'voiding postponement' without any restrictions or specifications. Other publications relevant to the topic were added. VP can represent a symptom in healthy children. As a condition, VP in combination with nocturnal enuresis (NE) is a subtype of non-monosymptomatic NE. Most studies have focused on daytime urinary incontinence (DUI) with VP, or more aptly termed voiding postponement incontinence (VPI). It is a behaviorally defined syndrome, i.e., by the habitual deferral of micturition and DUI. VPI is associated with a low micturition frequency, urgency and behavioral problems. The most common comorbid disorder is oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). VP as a symptom and VPI as a condition should be differentiated. VPI is a common disorder with many associated problems and disorders. Urotherapy and timed voiding are the main treatment approaches. Due to the high rate of comorbid ODD, other forms of treatment, especially cognitive behavioral therapy, are often needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 18%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Unspecified 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 9 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 32%
Psychology 8 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 21%
Unspecified 4 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 3 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2016.
All research outputs
#10,836,649
of 12,224,495 outputs
Outputs from European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
#844
of 969 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#281,880
of 341,057 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
#35
of 39 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 969 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.