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The "baby lung" became an adult

Overview of attention for article published in Intensive Care Medicine, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
213 Mendeley
Title
The "baby lung" became an adult
Published in
Intensive Care Medicine, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00134-015-4200-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luciano Gattinoni, John J. Marini, Antonio Pesenti, Michael Quintel, Jordi Mancebo, Laurent Brochard

Abstract

The baby lung was originally defined as the fraction of lung parenchyma that, in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), still maintains normal inflation. Its size obviously depends on ARDS severity and relates to the compliance of the respiratory system. CO2 clearance and blood oxygenation primarily occur within the baby lung. While the specific compliance suggests the intrinsic mechanical characteristics to be nearly normal, evidence from positron emission tomography suggests that at least a part of the well-aerated baby lung is inflamed. The baby lung is more a functional concept than an anatomical one; in fact, in the prone position, the baby lung "shifts" from the ventral lung regions toward the dorsal lung regions while usually increasing its size. This change is associated with better gas exchange, more homogeneously distributed trans-pulmonary forces, and a survival advantage. Positive end expiratory pressure also increases the baby lung size, both allowing better inflation of already open units and adding new pulmonary units. Viewed as surrogates of stress and strain, tidal volume and plateau pressures are better tailored to baby lung size than to ideal body weight. Although less information is available for the baby lung during spontaneous breathing efforts, the general principles regulating the safety of ventilation are also applicable under these conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 213 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Italy 3 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 204 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 36 17%
Other 28 13%
Student > Postgraduate 27 13%
Unspecified 25 12%
Student > Master 20 9%
Other 77 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 158 74%
Unspecified 31 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 5%
Engineering 4 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 1%
Other 6 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 December 2018.
All research outputs
#2,001,084
of 13,090,338 outputs
Outputs from Intensive Care Medicine
#960
of 3,372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,058
of 333,487 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Intensive Care Medicine
#17
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,090,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,372 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,487 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.