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Responses of peripheral endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-related compounds to hedonic eating in obesity

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, January 2016
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3 Facebook pages

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60 Mendeley
Title
Responses of peripheral endocannabinoids and endocannabinoid-related compounds to hedonic eating in obesity
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, January 2016
DOI 10.1007/s00394-016-1153-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

A M Monteleone, V Di Marzo, P Monteleone, R Dalle Grave, T Aveta, M El Ghoch, F Piscitelli, U Volpe, S Calugi, M Maj

Abstract

Hedonic eating occurs independently from homeostatic needs prompting the ingestion of pleasurable foods that are typically rich in fat, sugar and/or salt content. In normal weight healthy subjects, we found that before hedonic eating, plasma levels of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) were higher than before nonhedonic eating, and although they progressively decreased after food ingestion in both eating conditions, they were significantly higher in hedonic eating. Plasma levels of anandamide (AEA), oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), instead, progressively decreased in both eating conditions without significant differences. In this study, we investigated the responses of AEA, 2-AG, OEA and PEA to hedonic eating in obese individuals. Peripheral levels of AEA, 2-AG, OEA and PEA were measured in 14 obese patients after eating favourite (hedonic eating) and non-favourite (nonhedonic eating) foods in conditions of no homeostatic needs. Plasma levels of 2-AG increased after eating the favourite food, whereas they decreased after eating the non-favourite food, with the production of the endocannabinoid being significantly enhanced in hedonic eating. Plasma levels of AEA decreased progressively in nonhedonic eating, whereas they showed a decrease after the exposure to the favourite food followed by a return to baseline values after eating it. No significant differences emerged in plasma OEA and PEA responses to favourite and non-favourite food. Present findings compared with those obtained in our previously studied normal weight healthy subjects suggest deranged responses of endocannabinoids to food-related reward in obesity.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 3%
France 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 56 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 20%
Student > Master 11 18%
Unspecified 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 7 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 18 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 14 23%
Psychology 11 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 17%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Other 10 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2018.
All research outputs
#8,076,356
of 12,875,491 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#942
of 1,396 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#169,615
of 330,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#39
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,875,491 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,396 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,849 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.