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Microplastics in the aquatic and terrestrial environment: sources (with a specific focus on personal care products), fate and effects

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Sciences Europe, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 567)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
57 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
753 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
1847 Mendeley
Title
Microplastics in the aquatic and terrestrial environment: sources (with a specific focus on personal care products), fate and effects
Published in
Environmental Sciences Europe, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12302-015-0069-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karen Duis, Anja Coors

Abstract

Due to the widespread use and durability of synthetic polymers, plastic debris occurs in the environment worldwide. In the present work, information on sources and fate of microplastic particles in the aquatic and terrestrial environment, and on their uptake and effects, mainly in aquatic organisms, is reviewed. Microplastics in the environment originate from a variety of sources. Quantitative information on the relevance of these sources is generally lacking, but first estimates indicate that abrasion and fragmentation of larger plastic items and materials containing synthetic polymers are likely to be most relevant. Microplastics are ingested and, mostly, excreted rapidly by numerous aquatic organisms. So far, there is no clear evidence of bioaccumulation or biomagnification. In laboratory studies, the ingestion of large amounts of microplastics mainly led to a lower food uptake and, consequently, reduced energy reserves and effects on other physiological functions. Based on the evaluated data, the lowest microplastic concentrations affecting marine organisms exposed via water are much higher than levels measured in marine water. In lugworms exposed via sediment, effects were observed at microplastic levels that were higher than those in subtidal sediments but in the same range as maximum levels in beach sediments. Hydrophobic contaminants are enriched on microplastics, but the available experimental results and modelling approaches indicate that the transfer of sorbed pollutants by microplastics is not likely to contribute significantly to bioaccumulation of these pollutants. Prior to being able to comprehensively assess possible environmental risks caused by microplastics a number of knowledge gaps need to be filled. However, in view of the persistence of microplastics in the environment, the high concentrations measured at some environmental sites and the prospective of strongly increasing concentrations, the release of plastics into the environment should be reduced in a broad and global effort regardless of a proof of an environmental risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,847 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
South Africa 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 1833 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 317 17%
Student > Master 295 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 247 13%
Researcher 202 11%
Other 67 4%
Other 228 12%
Unknown 491 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 490 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 223 12%
Chemistry 119 6%
Engineering 112 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 78 4%
Other 234 13%
Unknown 591 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 94. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2020.
All research outputs
#355,895
of 21,988,477 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Sciences Europe
#18
of 567 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,384
of 406,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Sciences Europe
#3
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,988,477 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 567 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 406,417 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.