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Metformin Increases Overall Survival in Patients with Diabetes Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of Surgical Oncology, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Metformin Increases Overall Survival in Patients with Diabetes Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer
Published in
Annals of Surgical Oncology, December 2015
DOI 10.1245/s10434-015-5028-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tina Fransgaard, Lau Caspar Thygesen, Ismail Gögenur

Abstract

Emerging evidence suggests that metformin decreases the risk of developing colorectal cancer in patients with diabetes, but only few studies have examined potential survival benefits after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC). The purpose of the study was to examine the association between diabetes and overall survival after resection for CRC. Furthermore, the association between antidiabetic medication and overall survival was examined. Patients diagnosed with CRC between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012 were identified through the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's National Clinical Database (DCCG). The Danish National Patient Register (NPR) records all hospital contacts in Denmark, and the diagnosis of diabetes was identified by combining NPR data with use of antidiabetic drugs identified through the Danish National Prescription Registry and DCCG. The Kaplan-Meier estimator and the Cox regression model adjusted for important clinical risk factors were used. A total of 30,493 patients were included in the study, of which 3391 were diagnosed with diabetes and 1962 were treated with metformin. The adjusted HR of all-cause mortality for the diabetes group was 1.12 (1.06-1.18, p < 0.0001) compared with the nondiabetes group. The adjusted HR was 0.85 (0.73-0.93, p = 0.03) for the metformin-treated group compared with the insulin-treated group. A 12 % increase in all-cause mortality among patients with CRC and diabetes was found. Treatment with metformin was associated with a 15 % decreased all-cause mortality compared with patients with insulin-treated diabetes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 4%
Unknown 26 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 9 33%
Researcher 4 15%
Other 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 48%
Unspecified 11 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Social Sciences 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 January 2017.
All research outputs
#6,542,594
of 12,819,602 outputs
Outputs from Annals of Surgical Oncology
#1,543
of 3,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,701
of 355,325 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of Surgical Oncology
#40
of 166 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,819,602 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,325 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 166 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.