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Phosphoglyceride crystal deposition disease in the abdominal wall: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Surgical Case Reports, September 2018
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Title
Phosphoglyceride crystal deposition disease in the abdominal wall: a case report
Published in
Surgical Case Reports, September 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40792-018-0516-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Osamu Nakahara, Hideo Baba

Abstract

Phosphoglyceride crystal deposition disease (PGDD) is characterized by phosphoglyceride crystal deposition that simulates neoplasia in soft tissue scars or bone. Reports of PGDDs are rare. Here, we present the case of a patient with PGDD in the abdominal wall. A 57-year-old Japanese man with worsening right lower abdominal pain had no significant family or occupational history. Laboratory data showed elevated inflammatory markers with a white blood cell count of 14,400 × 109/L and C-reactive protein of 11.8 mg/L, but no other abnormalities. Helical computed tomography (CT) revealed a tumor in the abdominal wall (longest dimension, approximately 10 cm). Positron emission tomography-CT revealed fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in the mass only (SUVmax, 41). Clinical and radiographic findings suggested malignant lymphoma, undifferentiated sarcoma, or liposarcoma. He underwent exploratory laparotomy and further treatment. At surgery, we found a huge milky-whitish mass with a rough surface in the transversus abdominis. Complete resection was performed and his postoperative recovery was good. Surprisingly, the final pathologic diagnosis was phosphoglyceride crystal deposition disease with the characteristic crystal deposition in a corolla shape, histiocytic reaction with abundant foreign-body-type giant cells, and no evidence of neoplasia. The patient remains asymptomatic with no disease recurrence. Although phosphoglyceride crystal deposition disease in the abdominal wall is rarely encountered in clinical practice, its inclusion in differential diagnosis is important. Given the occurrence at sites of invasive procedures, we believe efforts to reduce invasiveness when performing surgery and follow-up for early detection of recurrence are important.

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

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Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 1 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 1 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 September 2018.
All research outputs
#12,004,381
of 13,536,508 outputs
Outputs from Surgical Case Reports
#55
of 134 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,430
of 265,978 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Surgical Case Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
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