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Do Women Pretend Orgasm to Retain a Mate?

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Sexual Behavior, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
22 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
60 Mendeley
Title
Do Women Pretend Orgasm to Retain a Mate?
Published in
Archives of Sexual Behavior, November 2011
DOI 10.1007/s10508-011-9874-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farnaz Kaighobadi, Todd K. Shackelford, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford

Abstract

The current study tested the hypothesis that women pretend orgasm as part of a broader strategy of mate retention. We obtained self-report data from 453 heterosexual women (M age, 21.8 years) in a long-term relationship (M length, 32.8 months) drawn from universities and surrounding communities in the southeastern United States. The results indicated that (1) women who perceived higher risk of partner infidelity were more likely to report pretending orgasm, (2) women who reported greater likelihood of pretending orgasm also reported performing more mate retention behaviors, and (3) women's perceptions of partner infidelity risk mediated the relationship between pretending orgasm and the performance of cost-inflicting mate retention behaviors, such as Intersexual Negative Inducements ("Flirted with someone in front of my partner") and Intrasexual Negative Inducements ("Yelled at a woman who looked at my partner"). Thus, pretending orgasm may be part of a broader strategy of mate retention performed by women who perceive higher risk of partner infidelity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 7%
Czechia 3 5%
Finland 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
France 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 48 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 23%
Student > Master 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Researcher 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 15 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 30 50%
Social Sciences 8 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 12%
Arts and Humanities 3 5%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 9 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 60. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2017.
All research outputs
#258,359
of 12,834,559 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#172
of 2,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,542
of 207,935 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Sexual Behavior
#2
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,834,559 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,399 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 207,935 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.