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Piloting the Use of Smartphones, Reminders, and Accountability Partners to Promote Skin Self-Examinations in Patients with Total Body Photography: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, July 2018
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Title
Piloting the Use of Smartphones, Reminders, and Accountability Partners to Promote Skin Self-Examinations in Patients with Total Body Photography: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s40257-018-0372-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew J. Marek, Emily Y. Chu, Michael E. Ming, Zeeshan A. Khan, Carrie L. Kovarik

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of a mobile application (app) in patients already using total body photography (TBP) to increase skin self-examination (SSE) rates and pilot the effectiveness of examination reminders and accountability partners. Randomized controlled trial with computer generated randomization table to allocate interventions. University of Pennsylvania pigmented lesion clinic. 69 patients aged 18 years or older with an iPhone/iPad, who were already in possession of TBP photographs. A mobile app loaded with digital TBP photos for all participants, and either (1) the mobile app only, (2) skin examination reminders, (3) an accountability partner, or (4) reminders and an accountability partner. Change in SSE rates as assessed by enrollment and end-of-study surveys 6 months later. Eighty one patients completed informed consent, however 12 patients did not complete trial enrollment procedures due to device incompatibility, leaving 69 patients who were randomized and analyzed [mean age 54.3 years, standard deviation 13.9). SSE rates increased significantly from 58% at baseline to 83% at 6 months (odds ratio 2.64, 95% confidence interval 1.20-4.09), with no difference among the intervention groups. The group with examination reminders alone had the highest (94%) overall satisfaction, and the group with accountability partners alone accounted for the lowest (71%). A mobile app alone, or with reminders and/or accountability partners, was found to be an effective tool that can help to increase SSE rates. Skin examination reminders may help provide a better overall experience for a subset of patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02520622.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 30%
Other 2 20%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 50%
Unspecified 3 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 10%
Unknown 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2018.
All research outputs
#11,815,511
of 13,316,854 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
#544
of 681 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,224
of 268,393 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Dermatology
#9
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,316,854 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 681 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.