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Peace in the Clinic: Rethinking “Global Health Diplomacy” in the Somali Region of Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
Title
Peace in the Clinic: Rethinking “Global Health Diplomacy” in the Somali Region of Ethiopia
Published in
Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s11013-015-9455-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lauren Carruth

Abstract

Drawing on ethnographic research with Somalis, within aid organizations, and within health care facilities in the Somali Region of Ethiopia, this article argues that what is called "global health diplomacy," despite its origins and articulations in interstate politics, is fundamentally local and interpersonal. As evidence, I outline two very different health programs in the Somali Region of Ethiopia, and how, in each, existing animosities and political grievances were either reinforced or undermined. I argue that the provision of health care in politically insecure and post-conflict settings like the Somali Region of Ethiopia is precarious but pivotal: medical encounters have the potential to either worsen the conditions in which conflicts and crises recur, or build new interpersonal and governmental relations of trust. Effective global health diplomacy, therefore, cannot be limited to building clinics and donating medicine, but must also explicitly include building positive relationships of trust between oppositional groups within clinical spaces.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 31%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Librarian 3 10%
Unspecified 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 12 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 10%
Unspecified 3 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 7%
Environmental Science 2 7%
Other 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,000,821
of 12,340,287 outputs
Outputs from Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry
#81
of 414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,937
of 257,086 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Culture, Medicine & Psychiatry
#9
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,340,287 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,086 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.