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Prevalence of seasonal depression in a prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 768)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
18 Mendeley
Title
Prevalence of seasonal depression in a prospective cohort study
Published in
European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience, July 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00406-018-0921-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Wirz-Justice, Vladeta Ajdacic, Wulf Rössler, Hans-Christoph Steinhausen, Jules Angst

Abstract

The prevalence of autumn/winter seasonality in depression has been documented in the longitudinal Zurich cohort study by five comprehensive diagnostic interviews at intervals over more than 20 years (N = 499). Repeated winter major depressive episodes (MDE-unipolar + bipolar) showed a prevalence of 3.44% (5× more women than men), whereas MDE with a single winter episode was much higher (9.96%). A total of 7.52% suffered from autumn/winter seasonality in major and minor depressive mood states. The clinical interviews revealed novel findings: high comorbidity of Social Anxiety Disorder and Agoraphobia within the repeated seasonal MDE group, high incidence of classic diurnal variation of mood (with evening improvement), as well as a high rate of oversensitivity to light, noise, or smell. Nearly twice as many of these individuals as in the other MDE groups manifested the syndrome of atypical depression (DSM-V), which supports the prior description of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) as presenting primarily atypical symptoms (which include hypersomnia and increase in appetite and weight). This long-term database of regular structured interviews provides important confirmation of SAD as a valid diagnosis, predominantly found in women, and with atypical vegetative symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 33%
Researcher 4 22%
Unspecified 3 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 33%
Neuroscience 5 28%
Unspecified 4 22%
Social Sciences 2 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 January 2019.
All research outputs
#714,509
of 13,516,653 outputs
Outputs from European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience
#31
of 768 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,267
of 268,192 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Archives of Psychiatry & Clinical Neuroscience
#2
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,516,653 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 768 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,192 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.