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Hausärztliche Palliativversorgung bei nichtonkologischen Patienten

Overview of attention for article published in Der Schmerz, September 2015
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
21 Mendeley
Title
Hausärztliche Palliativversorgung bei nichtonkologischen Patienten
Published in
Der Schmerz, September 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00482-015-0054-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. Afshar, K. Geiger, G. Müller-Mundt, J. Bleidorn, N. Schneider

Abstract

Most patients in the last phase of life can be treated in the context of generalist palliative care, especially by general practitioners. In contrast to specialized palliative care, non-cancer patients predominate in this setting. The aim of this article is to review the literature and elaborate current topics for non-cancer patients at the end of life in primary palliative care. A literature search was carried out in the databases PubMed and Scopus from 2008 to 2013 followed by a qualitative content analysis according to the PRISMA statement. A total of 127 articles could be included in the qualitative content analysis and the final review whereby four core topics were identified: (1) specific target groups (e.g. elderly patients, patients with advanced heart failure and pain), (2) collaboration of general practitioners with other physicians and health professions, (3) qualifications in palliative care and (4) provision of primary palliative care. Most articles found were related to the fourth topic and the subtopic of barriers and facilitators of palliative care. Insufficient coordination of the persons involved was a barrier often discussed. Advanced care planning including concrete aspects of palliative care at an early stage can be beneficial for both patients and professionals. The current literature search elucidates the importance of optimizing the processes and structures in providing palliative care and the discussion of end of life issues at an early stage in general practice. Therefore, a structured identification of palliative care needs identified by appropriate assessment instruments is crucial.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 29%
Other 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Librarian 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Unspecified 1 5%
Decision Sciences 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 3 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2015.
All research outputs
#9,378,178
of 12,222,940 outputs
Outputs from Der Schmerz
#142
of 230 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,928
of 240,219 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Der Schmerz
#4
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,940 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 230 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,219 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.