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Roles of RpoS in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis stress survival, motility, biofilm formation and type VI secretion system expression

Overview of attention for article published in The Journal of Microbiology, August 2015
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Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
Title
Roles of RpoS in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis stress survival, motility, biofilm formation and type VI secretion system expression
Published in
The Journal of Microbiology, August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s12275-015-0099-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jingyuan Guan, Xiao, Shengjuan Xu, Fen Gao, Jianbo Wang, Tietao Wang, Yunhong Song, Junfeng Pan, Xihui Shen, Yao Wang

Abstract

RpoS (σ(S)), the stationary phase/stress σ factor, controls the expression of a large number of genes involved in cellular responses to a variety of stresses. However, the role of RpoS appears to differ in different bacteria. While RpoS is an important regulator of flagellum biosynthesis, it is associated with biofilm development in Edwardsiella tarda. Biofilms are dense communities formed by bacteria and are important for microbe survival under unfavorable conditions. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) discovered recently is reportedly associated with several phenotypes, ranging from biofilm formation to stress sensing. For example, Vibrio anguillarum T6SS was proposed to serve as a sensor for extracytoplasmic signals and modulates RpoS expression and stress response. In this study, we investigated the physiological roles of RpoS in Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, including bacterial survival under stress conditions, flagella formation, biofilm development and T6SS expression. We found that RpoS is important in resistance to multiple stressors-including H2O2, acid, osmotic and heat shock-in Y. pseudotuberculosis. In addition, our study showed that RpoS not only modulates the expression of T6SS but also regulates flagellum formation by positively controlling the flagellar master regulatory gene flhDC, and affects the formation of biofilm on Caenorhabditis elegans by regulating the synthesis of exopolysaccharides. Taken together, these results show that RpoS plays a central role in cell fitness under several adverse conditions in Y. pseudotuberculosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 43%
Student > Master 4 17%
Student > Bachelor 4 17%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 61%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 June 2016.
All research outputs
#8,180,659
of 13,047,478 outputs
Outputs from The Journal of Microbiology
#230
of 484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#125,380
of 238,239 outputs
Outputs of similar age from The Journal of Microbiology
#6
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,047,478 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 484 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,239 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.