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A mathematical model of the dynamics of prion aggregates with chaperone-mediated fragmentation.

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Mathematical Biology, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
Title
A mathematical model of the dynamics of prion aggregates with chaperone-mediated fragmentation.
Published in
Journal of Mathematical Biology, August 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00285-015-0921-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Davis, Jason K, Sindi, Suzanne S

Abstract

Prions are proteins most commonly associated with fatal neurodegenerative diseases in mammals but are also responsible for a number of harmless heritable phenotypes in yeast. These states arise when a misfolded form of a protein appears and, rather than be removed by cellular quality control mechanisms, persists. The misfolded prion protein forms aggregates and is capable of converting normally folded protein to the misfolded state through direct interaction between the two forms. The dominant mathematical model for prion aggregate dynamics has been the nucleated polymerization model (NPM) which considers the dynamics of only the normal protein and the aggregates. However, for yeast prions the molecular chaperone Hsp104 is essential for prion propagation. Further, although mammals do not express Hsp104, experimental assays have shown Hsp104 also interacts with mammalian prion aggregates. In this study, we generalize the NPM to account for molecular chaperones and develop what we call the enzyme-limited nucleated polymerization model (ELNPM). We discuss existence, uniqueness and stability of solutions to our model and demonstrate that the NPM represents a quasi-steady-state reduction of our model. We validate the ELNPM by demonstrating agreement with experimental results on the yeast prion [Formula: see text] PSI [Formula: see text] that could not be supported by the NPM. Finally, we demonstrate that, in contrast to the NPM, the ELNPM permits the coexistence of multiple prion strains.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 8%
Russian Federation 1 4%
India 1 4%
Chile 1 4%
Unknown 20 80%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 40%
Student > Bachelor 6 24%
Student > Master 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Professor 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 32%
Physics and Astronomy 2 8%
Unspecified 1 4%
Mathematics 1 4%
Other 2 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,890,225
of 5,526,446 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Mathematical Biology
#144
of 211 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#133,924
of 194,206 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Mathematical Biology
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,526,446 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 211 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,206 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.