↓ Skip to main content

A multimodal neuroimaging study of a case of crossed nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurology, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
37 Mendeley
Title
A multimodal neuroimaging study of a case of crossed nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia
Published in
Journal of Neurology, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00415-015-7845-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Edoardo G. Spinelli, Francesca Caso, Federica Agosta, Giuseppe Gambina, Giuseppe Magnani, Elisa Canu, Valeria Blasi, Daniela Perani, Giancarlo Comi, Andrea Falini, Maria Luisa Gorno-Tempini, Massimo Filippi

Abstract

Crossed aphasia has been reported mainly as post-stroke aphasia resulting from brain damage ipsilateral to the dominant right hand. Here, we described a case of a crossed nonfluent/agrammatic primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA), who developed a corticobasal syndrome (CBS). We collected clinical, cognitive, and neuroimaging data for four consecutive years from a 55-year-old right-handed lady (JV) presenting with speech disturbances. 18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ((18)F-FDG PET) and DaT-scan with (123)I-Ioflupane were obtained. Functional MRI (fMRI) during a verb naming task was acquired to characterize patterns of language lateralization. Diffusion tensor MRI was used to evaluate white matter damage within the language network. At onset, JV presented with prominent speech output impairment and right frontal atrophy. After 3 years, language deficits worsened, with the occurrence of a mild agrammatism. The patient also developed a left-sided mild extrapyramidal bradykinetic-rigid syndrome. The clinical picture was suggestive of nfvPPA with mild left-sided extrapyramidal syndrome. At this time, voxel-wise SPM analyses of (18)F-FDG PET and structural MRI showed right greater than left frontal hypometabolism and damage, which included the Broca's area. DaT-scan showed a reduced uptake in the right striatum. FMRI during naming task demonstrated bilateral language activations, and tractography showed right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) involvement. Over the following year, JV became mute and developed frank left-sided motor signs and symptoms, evolving into a CBS clinical picture. Brain atrophy worsened in frontal areas bilaterally, and extended to temporo-parietal regions, still with a right-sided asymmetry. Tractography showed an extension of damage to the left SLF and right inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We report a case of crossed nfvPPA followed longitudinally and studied with advanced neuroimaging techniques. The results highlight a complex interaction between individual premorbid developmental differences and the clinical phenotype.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 36 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Unspecified 4 11%
Other 10 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 24%
Unspecified 7 19%
Psychology 6 16%
Neuroscience 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 8 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2016.
All research outputs
#1,219,934
of 12,220,568 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurology
#158
of 2,306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,717
of 238,212 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurology
#10
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,568 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,306 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,212 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.