↓ Skip to main content

Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins

Overview of attention for article published in Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
Title
Scaffolding during the cell cycle by A-kinase anchoring proteins
Published in
Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00424-015-1718-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

B. Han, W. J. Poppinga, M. Schmidt

Abstract

Cell division relies on coordinated regulation of the cell cycle. A process including a well-defined series of strictly regulated molecular mechanisms involving cyclin-dependent kinases, retinoblastoma protein, and polo-like kinases. Dysfunctions in cell cycle regulation are associated with disease such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration. Compartmentalization of cellular signaling is a common strategy used to ensure the accuracy and efficiency of cellular responses. Compartmentalization of intracellular signaling is maintained by scaffolding proteins, such as A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). AKAPs are characterized by their ability to anchor the regulatory subunits of protein kinase A (PKA), and thereby achieve guidance to different cellular locations via various targeting domains. Next to PKA, AKAPs also associate with several other signaling elements including receptors, ion channels, protein kinases, phosphatases, small GTPases, and phosphodiesterases. Taking the amount of possible AKAP signaling complexes and their diverse localization into account, it is rational to believe that such AKAP-based complexes regulate several critical cellular events of the cell cycle. In fact, several AKAPs are assigned as tumor suppressors due to their vital roles in cell cycle regulation. Here, we first briefly discuss the most important players of cell cycle progression. After that, we will review our recent knowledge of AKAPs linked to the regulation and progression of the cell cycle, with special focus on AKAP12, AKAP8, and Ezrin. At last, we will discuss this specific AKAP subset in relation to diseases with focus on a diverse subset of cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 28 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 34%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Unspecified 3 10%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 24%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 10%
Unspecified 3 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Other 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 July 2015.
All research outputs
#10,830,701
of 12,216,894 outputs
Outputs from Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
#1,077
of 1,204 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,400
of 238,216 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pflugers Archiv European Journal of Physiology
#23
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,216,894 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,204 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,216 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.