↓ Skip to main content

Vascular graft employment in the surgical treatment of acute and chronic acromio-clavicular dislocation

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
Title
Vascular graft employment in the surgical treatment of acute and chronic acromio-clavicular dislocation
Published in
European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00590-015-1672-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matteo Vitali, Alberto Pedretti, Nadim Naim Rodriguez, Alessandro Franceschi, Gianfranco Fraschini

Abstract

To show the efficiency and safety of a surgical treatment in both acute and chronic acromio-clavicular junction (ACJ) dislocations. Retrospective. Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology at IRCCS San Raffaele Hospital. This study was performed on 37 subjects classified as Rockwood grade III-V or Tossy III ACJ dislocation. The surgical treatment was carried out by placing a vascular graft (GorePropaten(®)) between the tip of the coracoid process and the mid-lateral side of the clavicle with two temporary percutaneous K-wires positioned in a parallel manner in the AC ligament through the acromion and clavicle for 30 days to improve stability. Outcomes were assessed using the Constant Shoulder (CS) score, DASH score, subjective satisfaction, and stability of AC joint at 24 months. UCLA scores taken preoperatively and at 15-month follow-up were used to perform statistical analysis significance using a control group treated conservatively. Postoperative X-rays were examined to assess joint stability after 24 months. Preoperative CS score was 51 ± 12 in the acute group and 55 ± 15 in the chronic group. Follow-up mean CS score was 88 ± 11 in the acute group and 82 ± 20 in the chronic group at 24 months. Preoperative DASH score was 19 ± 3 in the acute group and 14 ± 5 in the chronic group. Mean DASH score was 3.60 ± 7 in the acute group and 6.42 ± 6 in the chronic group. Preoperative UCLA scores were 14.6 ± 2 and 15 ± 7 in the acute group and chronic group, respectively. At 15-month follow-up, UCLA scores of 28.1 ± 1.9 and 27.7 ± 1 in the acute and chronic group, respectively, showed a significant improvement (p < 0.05) compared with UCLA scores taken preoperatively and at 15 months in the control group treated conservatively of 15.8 ± 0.9 and 16.2 ± 0.9, respectively. Results were good to excellent in 10 patients from the acute group and 23 patients from the chronic group who presented clinical stability of the AC joint without pain. Postoperative radiography showed anatomical repositioning of the ACJ and joint stability in 35 cases, but only two patients showed a partial re-dislocation at the 24-month X-ray follow-up. No infections, either deep or superficial, or nerve palsies were reported. Given the results obtained during the study and the response of the patients in both acute and chronic groups, the authors found that the employment of a vascular graft combined with temporary percutaneous K-wires is able to improve the patient's clinical outcome following an acromio-clavicular joint dislocation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 4%
Unknown 22 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Unspecified 2 9%
Other 9 39%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 39%
Unspecified 7 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Psychology 1 4%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 July 2015.
All research outputs
#11,135,253
of 12,519,471 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology
#272
of 570 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,955
of 235,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery & Traumatology
#20
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,519,471 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 570 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,459 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.