↓ Skip to main content

Central nervous system rather than immune cell-derived BDNF mediates axonal protective effects early in autoimmune demyelination

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica, October 2011
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
50 Mendeley
Title
Central nervous system rather than immune cell-derived BDNF mediates axonal protective effects early in autoimmune demyelination
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica, October 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00401-011-0890-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

De-Hyung Lee, Eva Geyer, Anne-Christine Flach, Klaus Jung, Ralf Gold, Alexander Flügel, Ralf A. Linker, Fred Lühder

Abstract

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is involved in neuronal and glial development and survival. While neurons and astrocytes are its main cellular source in the central nervous system (CNS), bioactive BDNF is also expressed in immune cells and in lesions of multiple sclerosis and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Previous data revealed that BDNF exerts neuroprotective effects in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE. Using a conditional knock-out model with inducible deletion of BDNF, we here show that clinical symptoms and structural damage are increased when BDNF is absent during the initiation phase of clinical EAE. In contrast, deletion of BDNF later in the disease course of EAE did not result in significant changes, either in the disease course or in axonal integrity. Bone marrow chimeras revealed that the deletion of BDNF in the CNS alone, with no deletion of BDNF in the infiltrating immune cells, was sufficient for the observed effects. Finally, the therapeutic effect of glatiramer acetate, a well-characterized disease-modifying drug with the potential to modulate BDNF expression, was partially reversed in mice in which BDNF was deleted shortly before the onset of disease. In summary, our data argue for an early window of therapeutic opportunity where modulation of BDNF may exert neuroprotective effects in experimental autoimmune demyelination.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 48 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 20%
Researcher 9 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Other 15 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 36%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Neuroscience 7 14%
Unspecified 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2011.
All research outputs
#7,636,790
of 12,219,721 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica
#1,309
of 1,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,897
of 102,862 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica
#16
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,219,721 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,532 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 102,862 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.