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Cellular Proteins Act as Bridge Between 5′ and 3′ Ends of the Coxsackievirus B3 Mediating Genome Circularization During RNA Translation

Overview of attention for article published in Current Microbiology, July 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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2 tweeters

Citations

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12 Mendeley
Title
Cellular Proteins Act as Bridge Between 5′ and 3′ Ends of the Coxsackievirus B3 Mediating Genome Circularization During RNA Translation
Published in
Current Microbiology, July 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00284-015-0866-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amira Souii, Manel Ben M’hadheb-Gharbi, Jawhar Gharbi

Abstract

The positive single-stranded RNA genome of the Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) contains a 5' untranslated region (UTR) which hosts the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element that governs cap-independent translation initiation and a polyadenylated 3' UTR which is required for stimulating the IRES activity. Viral RNA genomes could circularize to regulate initiation of translation and RNA synthesis at 5' and 3' ends. Interactions could either take place by direct RNA-RNA contacts, through cellular protein bridges mediating RNA circularization or both. Accordingly, we aimed to assess the nature of molecular interactions between these two regions and to evaluate cellular factors required for mRNA 3' end-mediated stimulation of CVB3 IRES-driven translation. By gel shift assays, we have showed that combining, in vitro, 5' and 3' UTR fragments had no discernible effect on the structures of RNAs, arguing against the presence of specific canonical RNA-RNA cyclization sequences between these two regions. Competitive UV crosslinking assays using BHK-21 cell extract showed common cellular proteins eIF3b, PTB, and La binding to both 5'- and 3' end RNAs. PCBP 1-2 and PABP were shown to bind, respectively, to 5' and 3' UTR probes. Taking together, these data suggest that CVB3 5'-3' end bridging occurs through 5' UTR-protein-protein-3' UTR interactions and not through RNA-RNA direct contact. The dual involvement of the 3' and 5' UTRs in controlling viral translation and RNA synthesis highlights the relevance of these regions in the infectious virus life cycle, making them suitable candidates for targeted CVB3 antiviral therapy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 25%
Researcher 2 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 17%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 3 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 33%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 25%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 17%
Computer Science 1 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Other 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 July 2015.
All research outputs
#9,880,975
of 12,378,406 outputs
Outputs from Current Microbiology
#1,065
of 1,386 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#166,065
of 241,603 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Microbiology
#18
of 39 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,378,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,386 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,603 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 39 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.