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Histological improvement of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with a prebiotic: a pilot clinical trial

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Nutrition, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
Title
Histological improvement of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis with a prebiotic: a pilot clinical trial
Published in
European Journal of Nutrition, May 2018
DOI 10.1007/s00394-018-1721-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marc R. Bomhof, Jill A. Parnell, Hena R. Ramay, Pam Crotty, Kevin P. Rioux, Chris S. Probert, Saumya Jayakumar, Maitreyi Raman, Raylene A. Reimer

Abstract

In obesity and diabetes the liver is highly susceptible to abnormal uptake and storage of fat. In certain individuals hepatic steatosis predisposes to the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a disease marked by hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. Although the precise pathophysiology of NASH is unknown, it is believed that the gut microbiota-liver axis influences the development of this disease. With few treatment strategies available for NASH, exploration of gut microbiota-targeted interventions is warranted. We investigated the therapeutic potential of a prebiotic supplement to improve histological parameters of NASH. In a placebo-controlled, randomized pilot trial, 14 individuals with liver-biopsy-confirmed NASH [non-alcoholic fatty liver activity score (NAS) ≥ 5] were randomized to receive oligofructose (8 g/day for 12 weeks followed by 16 g/day for 24 weeks) or isocaloric placebo for 9 months. The primary outcome measure was the change in liver biopsy NAS score and the secondary outcomes included changes in body weight, body composition, glucose tolerance, inflammatory markers, and gut microbiota. Independent of weight loss, oligofructose improved liver steatosis relative to placebo and improved overall NAS score (P = 0.016). Bifidobacterium was enhanced by oligofructose, whereas bacteria within Clostridium cluster XI and I were reduced with oligofructose (P < 0.05). There were no adverse side effects that deterred individuals from consuming oligofructose for treatment of this disease. Independent of other lifestyle changes, prebiotic supplementation reduced histologically-confirmed steatosis in patients with NASH. Larger follow-up studies are warranted. This trial was registered at Clinicaltrials.com as NCT03184376.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 8 36%
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 9%
Other 4 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 13 59%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Psychology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2019.
All research outputs
#7,018,085
of 13,253,606 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Nutrition
#796
of 1,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#118,257
of 270,639 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Nutrition
#23
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,253,606 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,450 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,639 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.