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Engagement in New Dietary Habits—Obese Women’s Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
Title
Engagement in New Dietary Habits—Obese Women’s Experiences from Participating in a 2-Year Diet Intervention
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, June 2015
DOI 10.1007/s12529-015-9495-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina Ahlgren, Anne Hammarström, Susanne Sandberg, Bernt Lindahl, Tommy Olsson, Christel Larsson, Anncristine Fjellman-Wiklund

Abstract

Dietary weight loss interventions most often result in weight loss, but weight maintenance on a long-term basis is the main problem in obesity treatment. There is a need for an increased understanding of the behaviour patterns involved in adopting a new dietary behavior and to maintain the behaviour over time. The purpose of this paper is to explore overweight and obese middle-aged women's experiences of the dietary change processes when participating in a 2-year-long diet intervention. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with 12 overweight and obese women (54-71 years) were made after their participation in a diet intervention programme. The programme was designed as a RCT study comparing a diet according to the Nordic nutrition recommendations (NNR diet) and a Palaeolithic diet (PD). Interviews were analysed according to Grounded Theory principles. A core category "Engagement phases in the process of a diet intervention" concluded the analysis. Four categories included the informants' experiences during different stages of the process of dietary change: "Honeymoon phase", "Everyday life phase", "It's up to you phase" and "Crossroads phase". The early part of the intervention period was called "Honeymoon phase" and was characterised by positive experiences, including perceived weight loss and extensive support. The next phases, the "Everyday life phase" and "It's up to you phase", contained the largest obstacles to change. The home environment appeared as a crucial factor, which could be decisive for maintenance of the new dietary habits or relapse into old habits in the last phase called "Crossroads phase". We identified various phases of engagement in the process of a long-term dietary intervention among middle-aged women. A clear personal goal and support from family and friends seem to be of major importance for long-term maintenance of new dietary habits. Gender relations within the household must be considered as a possible obstacle for women engaging in diet intervention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Denmark 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 36%
Unspecified 7 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 22%
Unspecified 9 20%
Psychology 8 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 16%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Other 8 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,329,611
of 13,040,640 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#159
of 533 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,147
of 233,908 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
#3
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,640 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 74th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 533 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 233,908 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.