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Childhood obesity and its physical and psychological co-morbidities: a systematic review of Australian children and adolescents

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Pediatrics, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 2,136)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
twitter
4 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
66 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
179 Mendeley
Title
Childhood obesity and its physical and psychological co-morbidities: a systematic review of Australian children and adolescents
Published in
European Journal of Pediatrics, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00431-015-2551-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ross H. Sanders, Ahreum Han, Julien S. Baker, Stephen Cobley

Abstract

Australia is predicted to have the highest overweight/obesity rate in the world by 2022 outranking the USA and UK. The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the associations between childhood obesity and physical and psychological health co-morbidities. Therefore, a systematic literature search was conducted from six databases (2004-2014). Studies were included if they investigated obesity-related co-morbidities with participants residing in Australia aged 0-18 years. Forty-seven studies fulfilled selection criteria. Evidence suggests that overweight/obese Australian children and adolescents, compared to normal-weight peers, had more cardio-metabolic risk factors and higher risk factors of non-alcohol fatty liver disease and were experiencing more negative psychological outcomes (depression, low self-esteem and lower scores of health-related quality of life). Many other health consequences have either not been investigated in Australia, or as frequently as in other countries. Given Australia's current overweight/obesity prevalence and trajectory, Australia-based studies are needed to identify the suspected co-morbidities, understand the range of individual, social and environmental mechanisms driving obesity, and help identify policies, interventions and strategies that will change the future trajectory and 'disease burden' both in Australia and internationally. What is Known: •Trend analyses have shown that obesity prevalence in Australia is increasing and will outrank UK and the USA by 2022. •Every third Australian child/adolescent between 5 and 19 years old is predicted to be classified as overweight or obese by 2025. •Childhood obesity is associated with multiple immediate physical and psychological health co-morbidities as well as co-morbidities in adulthood. These have often been identified and examined individually. What is New: •This paper presents a holistic picture of childhood obesity and the associated multiple co-morbidities in Australia. •The extensive health-related outcomes from childhood obesity and those requiring further research are identified. •The findings of this paper will influence the development of local/regional, state and national strategies to change Australia's future trajectory.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 179 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 177 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 41 23%
Student > Master 40 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 16%
Unspecified 22 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 8%
Other 33 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 18%
Unspecified 29 16%
Psychology 20 11%
Sports and Recreations 12 7%
Other 39 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 91. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2016.
All research outputs
#147,184
of 12,220,965 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Pediatrics
#4
of 2,136 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,658
of 221,954 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Pediatrics
#1
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,220,965 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,136 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,954 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.