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Evidence for horizontal transfer of Wolbachia by a Drosophila mite

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental & Applied Acarology, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#42 of 573)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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13 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
52 Mendeley
Title
Evidence for horizontal transfer of Wolbachia by a Drosophila mite
Published in
Experimental & Applied Acarology, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10493-015-9918-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy N. Brown, Vett K. Lloyd

Abstract

Mites are common ectoparasites of Drosophila and have been implicated in bacterial and mobile element invasion of Drosophila stocks. The obligate endobacterium, Wolbachia, has widespread effects on gene expression in their arthropod hosts and alters host reproduction to enhance its survival and propagation, often with deleterious effects in Drosophila hosts. To determine whether Wolbachia could be transferred between Drosophila melanogaster laboratory stocks by the mite Tyrophagus putrescentiae, mites were introduced to Wolbachia-infected Drosophila vials. These vials were kept adjacent to mite-free and Wolbachia-uninfected Drosophila stock vials. The Wolbachia infection statuses of the infected and uninfected flies were checked from generation 1 to 5. Results indicate that Wolbachia DNA could be amplified from mites infesting Wolbachia-infected fly stocks and infection in the previously uninfected stocks arose within generation 1 or 2, concomitant with invasion of mites from the Wolbachia-infected stock. A possible mechanism for the transfer of Wolbachia from flies to mites and vice versa, can be inferred from time-lapse photography of fly and mite interactions. We demonstrated that mites ingest Drosophila corpses, including Wolbachia-infected corpses, and Drosophila larva ingest mites, providing possible sources of Wolbachia infection and transfer. This research demonstrated that T. putrescentiae white mites can facilitate Wolbachia transfer between Drosophila stocks and that this may occur by ingestion of infected corpses. Mite-vectored Wolbachia transfer allows for rapid establishment of Wolbachia infection within a new population. This mode of Wolbachia introduction may be relevant in nature as well as in the laboratory, and could have a variety of biological consequences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 13 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Brazil 2 4%
Italy 1 2%
Colombia 1 2%
Czechia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Portugal 1 2%
Unknown 43 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 12 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 21%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Master 7 13%
Other 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 6 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 75%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2016.
All research outputs
#2,328,791
of 14,173,201 outputs
Outputs from Experimental & Applied Acarology
#42
of 573 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,040
of 228,561 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental & Applied Acarology
#1
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,173,201 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 573 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 228,561 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.