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Tungiasis in a free-ranging jaguar (Panthera onca) population in Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Parasitology Research, August 2011
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136 Mendeley
Title
Tungiasis in a free-ranging jaguar (Panthera onca) population in Brazil
Published in
Parasitology Research, August 2011
DOI 10.1007/s00436-011-2625-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cynthia E. Widmer, Fernando C. C. Azevedo

Abstract

Tungiasis is an ectoparasitic disease caused by fleas of the genus Tunga. The disease is reported to occur mostly in human populations. In wildlife, however, the occurrence and impact of this disease remains uncertain. We captured and examined 12 free-ranging jaguars for the presence of Tunga penetrans in the Pantanal region of Mato Grosso do Sul state, Brazil. Tungiasis prevalence was 100% in the population; lesions were confined to the jaguar's paws. T. penetrans was identified based on the characteristics of the embedded fleas and the morphological identification of a collected free-living flea. The intensity and stage of infestation varied between individual animals. However, in general, all captured jaguars were in good health. The 100% prevalence of tungiasis may be related to the fact that all captures were performed during the dry season. Their high ecological requirements for space make jaguars potential disseminators of T. penetrans in the Pantanal region. Because cattle ranching and ecotourism are the main economic activities in the Pantanal, further studies should evaluate the risks of tungiasis to human and animal health. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of tungiasis in jaguars.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 136 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 6 4%
United Kingdom 2 1%
India 1 <1%
United Arab Emirates 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 118 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 34 25%
Student > Master 29 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 13%
Other 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Other 32 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 82 60%
Environmental Science 29 21%
Unspecified 10 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Other 7 5%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2011.
All research outputs
#3,063,416
of 4,507,509 outputs
Outputs from Parasitology Research
#587
of 1,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,365
of 65,959 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasitology Research
#10
of 22 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 1,093 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.