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Temporal Dynamics of Active Prokaryotic Nitrifiers and Archaeal Communities from River to Sea

Overview of attention for article published in Microbial Ecology, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
27 Mendeley
Title
Temporal Dynamics of Active Prokaryotic Nitrifiers and Archaeal Communities from River to Sea
Published in
Microbial Ecology, April 2015
DOI 10.1007/s00248-015-0601-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mylène Hugoni, Hélène Agogué, Najwa Taib, Isabelle Domaizon, Anne Moné, Pierre E. Galand, Gisèle Bronner, Didier Debroas, Isabelle Mary

Abstract

To test if different niches for potential nitrifiers exist in estuarine systems, we assessed by pyrosequencing the diversity of archaeal gene transcript markers for taxonomy (16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)) during an entire year along a salinity gradient in surface waters of the Charente estuary (Atlantic coast, France). We further investigated the potential for estuarine prokaryotes to oxidize ammonia and hydrolyze urea by quantifying thaumarchaeal amoA and ureC and bacterial amoA transcripts. Our results showed a succession of different nitrifiers from river to sea with bacterial amoA transcripts dominating in the freshwater station while archaeal transcripts were predominant in the marine station. The 16S rRNA sequence analysis revealed that Thaumarchaeota marine group I (MGI) were the most abundant overall but other archaeal groups like Methanosaeta were also potentially active in winter (December-March) and Euryarchaeota marine group II (MGII) were dominant in seawater in summer (April-August). Each station also contained different Thaumarchaeota MGI phylogenetic clusters, and the clusters' microdiversity was associated to specific environmental conditions suggesting the presence of ecotypes adapted to distinct ecological niches. The amoA and ureC transcript dynamics further indicated that some of the Thaumarchaeota MGI subclusters were involved in ammonia oxidation through the hydrolysis of urea. Our findings show that ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Bacteria were adapted to contrasted conditions and that the Thaumarchaeota MGI diversity probably corresponds to distinct metabolisms or life strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 4%
Canada 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 33%
Researcher 5 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 15%
Unspecified 3 11%
Other 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 11 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 33%
Unspecified 4 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2016.
All research outputs
#6,602,178
of 12,230,855 outputs
Outputs from Microbial Ecology
#695
of 1,161 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,482
of 221,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbial Ecology
#20
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,230,855 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,161 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,410 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.