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Do rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceive illusory motion?

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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15 Mendeley
Title
Do rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceive illusory motion?
Published in
Animal Cognition, March 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10071-015-0860-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian Agrillo, Simone Gori, Michael J. Beran

Abstract

During the last decade, visual illusions have been used repeatedly to understand similarities and differences in visual perception of human and non-human animals. However, nearly all studies have focused only on illusions not related to motion perception, and to date, it is unknown whether non-human primates perceive any kind of motion illusion. In the present study, we investigated whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) perceived one of the most popular motion illusions in humans, the Rotating Snake illusion (RSI). To this purpose, we set up four experiments. In Experiment 1, subjects initially were trained to discriminate static versus dynamic arrays. Once reaching the learning criterion, they underwent probe trials in which we presented the RSI and a control stimulus identical in overall configuration with the exception that the order of the luminance sequence was changed in a way that no apparent motion is perceived by humans. The overall performance of monkeys indicated that they spontaneously classified RSI as a dynamic array. Subsequently, we tested adult humans in the same task with the aim of directly comparing the performance of human and non-human primates (Experiment 2). In Experiment 3, we found that monkeys can be successfully trained to discriminate between the RSI and a control stimulus. Experiment 4 showed that a simple change in luminance sequence in the two arrays could not explain the performance reported in Experiment 3. These results suggest that some rhesus monkeys display a human-like perception of this motion illusion, raising the possibility that the neurocognitive systems underlying motion perception may be similar between human and non-human primates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 7%
United Kingdom 1 7%
Unknown 13 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 20%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Master 2 13%
Other 2 13%
Lecturer 2 13%
Other 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 53%
Unspecified 3 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 7%
Neuroscience 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2015.
All research outputs
#2,570,532
of 12,222,940 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#385
of 902 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,914
of 219,763 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#17
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,222,940 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 902 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,763 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.