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Hereditary causes of kidney stones and chronic kidney disease

Overview of attention for article published in Pediatric Nephrology, January 2013
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89 Mendeley
Title
Hereditary causes of kidney stones and chronic kidney disease
Published in
Pediatric Nephrology, January 2013
DOI 10.1007/s00467-012-2329-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Vidar O. Edvardsson, David S. Goldfarb, John C. Lieske, Lada Beara-Lasic, Franca Anglani, Dawn S. Milliner, Runolfur Palsson

Abstract

Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, familial hypomagnesemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis (FHHNC), and primary hyperoxaluria (PH) are rare but important causes of severe kidney stone disease and/or chronic kidney disease in children. Recurrent kidney stone disease and nephrocalcinosis, particularly in pre-pubertal children, should alert the physician to the possibility of an inborn error of metabolism as the underlying cause. Unfortunately, the lack of recognition and knowledge of the five disorders has frequently resulted in an unacceptable delay in diagnosis and treatment, sometimes with grave consequences. A high index of suspicion coupled with early diagnosis may reduce or even prevent the serious long-term complications of these diseases. In this paper, we review the epidemiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with APRT deficiency, cystinuria, Dent disease, FHHNC, and PH, with an emphasis on childhood manifestations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 1%
Malaysia 1 1%
Sri Lanka 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 85 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Student > Postgraduate 9 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 10%
Other 8 9%
Other 29 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 60 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 10%
Unspecified 4 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Other 4 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2015.
All research outputs
#3,433,543
of 4,849,872 outputs
Outputs from Pediatric Nephrology
#521
of 826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,769
of 145,755 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pediatric Nephrology
#30
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,849,872 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 826 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.6. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 145,755 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.